Let's Move Lincolnshire

Our strategy to tackle the challenge of inactivity. Find out more

About us

Active Lincolnshire is committed to providing opportunities for everyone in Lincolnshire to be active every day. We work with partners to address inequalities and inactivity, responding to the needs of people and places.

What we do

As advocates for the positive power that physical activity has on everyone’s lives, we work in partnership to improve understanding, influence change, and tackle the challenge of inactivity.

Knowledge Hub

Our Knowledge Hub is the core of our website. Here you’ll find our guidance, advice, insight and support in all areas of physical activity and sport.

Get involved

Want to get involved with us? We depend on your collaboration to create and influence meaningful change. Find out how you can help Lincolnshire move more.

Tackling inequalities

Let’s Move Lincolnshire
Strategy 2022 | Chapter 6

  • Tackling inequalities

    Tackling inequalities

    Recognising the deep-rooted inequalities that prevent local people living active lives.

    “Right now, the opportunities to get involved in sport and activity – and reap the rewards of being active – depend too much on your background, your gender, your bank balance and your postcode.”
    Sport England, Uniting the Movement

    Each and every one of us should have access to spaces, facilities, services and support that empowers us to be active – that fuels good physical and mental health, raises living standards and makes us feel part of our communities. Activity should be a normal part of our lives, no matter who we are. But today, across Lincolnshire and many areas of the UK, that’s just not the case.

    During the the Let’s Move Lincolnshire strategy consultation, surveying and talking to citizens across the county clearly demonstrated that fewer than half of the people we spoke to felt represented by their local community, with many of those voicing concerns about feeling comfortable, or having a sense they belonged.

    People told us they felt excluded from physical activity for a host of reasons – where they live, their income, ethnicity, health and gender. Intersectional issues around deprivation, cost, access and transport also created real challenges in increasing activity levels. All of these factors have established damaging inequalities, meaning that, all too often, the people who could benefit most from a more active lifestyle, feel excluded because the access and opportunities aren’t there.

    Ethnicity

    Here in Lincolnshire, many Black and ethnic minority people feel underrepresented in the places decisions are made, impacting their sense of belonging and making them feel unseen and unheard. Without a voice in the design of systems, spaces and support, it’s easy for people to feel excluded and unwelcome when it comes to sport and physical activity.

    This is underlined by Sport England’s Sport for All report, which found that, across England, people from Asian and Black backgrounds are far more likely to be inactive.

    “I feel out of place in exercise environments because of my ethnicity and weight.” Lincolnshire citizen


    Gender

    Sport England’s research tells us that women are less active than men, with a gender gap opening up at a very young age. One barrier to increasing activity among women and girls is a lack of environments where they feel safe and comfortable exercising alone.

    Our Lincolnshire consultation showed that women are acutely aware of the perceived and real risks involved in solo physical activity. They adapt their behaviour to avoid certain routes, stay in well-lit areas and avoid unwanted attention – all with the aim of managing and mitigating safety concerns. Feelings of vulnerability feed into issues of self-esteem and anxiety, showing how important it is that we create safe active environments that improve psychological security.

    “Being active in Lincolnshire comes with an element of risk. Road running is becoming increasingly concerning as a female… lights are shut off on certain routes, which I actively avoid, and I tend to run more in the centre of town – but that attracts attention. My partner worries for me going out for a run in the dark. I like the Sustrans cycle routes, but as a woman I feel too vulnerable to use them alone.”
    Lincolnshire citizen

    Income

    Socio-economic factors also have a significant part to play in excluding people from physical activity and sport. Families we spoke to reported struggling with the cost of transport and activity classes, forcing them to prioritise other living expenses. This is backed up by Sport England’s findings that people in a lower socio-economic group are far more likely to be inactive.

    15% of Lincolnshire residents feel they can’t afford to be more active.

    Health

    People who have disabilities and long-term health conditions are twice as likely to be physically inactive as those who don’t, according to Sport England’s report. It’s a finding that’s supported by our own Let’s Move consultation, in which local residents told us they find it difficult to access sport and physical activity settings where they feel welcomed and supported.

    One fifth of Lincolnshire residents agree or somewhat agree that they can’t access places or facilities where they could be active.

  • Let’s Move everyone

    Let’s Move everyone

    The data, the research and the consultation all tell us that here in Lincolnshire, like many other places in the UK, we face real challenges around inequality and access to activity.

    Each of the groups we’ve looked at experiences both unique and shared difficulties. While, in reality, people aren’t just defined by their ethnicity, gender, income or anything else, there are clear patterns in the lives and backgrounds of people who feel excluded from physical activity. Together, it’s our job to remove those barriers.

    Towards better representation

    Equality, diversity and inclusion form the golden thread that runs right through the Let’s Move Lincolnshire strategy and the work we’re doing across the county.

    There’s a national public interest in – and demand for – more equality and equity, as demonstrated through the growing, vocal support for movements like MeToo and Black Lives Matter. As our consultation proves, Lincolnshire echoes these national, and indeed global, sentiments.

    Better representation, greater equality and fairer opportunities for all are the bare minimum our residents deserve, and we need to rise to the challenge of providing them. There’s a priority need for diverse voices to be reflected and represented across our county. Achieving this will mean we’re able to make our communities more inclusive places where people feel they belong – where their concerns are heard, their needs are met and they’re able to lead more active, healthy lives.

  • Making It Happen

    Actions

    Stakeholders, organisations, businesses, policymakers, statutory bodies and community leaders to develop a better shared understanding of the people in Lincolnshire who face greater barriers to participation in physical activity.

    Together, we need to welcome and listen to the diverse voices in our communities and make sure they feed directly into the design and development of inclusive activities.

    Impacts of working in this way

    • Equity of provision and access across the county
      - Greater feeling of comfort and belonging in our communities
    • Ability to focus systems, services and support on excluded groups
    • Understanding of what’s needed to make spaces safe, inclusive and accessible

    How do we make it happen?

    • Listen and understand the audiences facing grater inequalities
    • Co create and co design options with the audiences we are aiming to serve
    • Commit to empowering all people across the county to lead more active lives
    • Recognise the specific barriers and needs of groups experiencing exclusion

    Focus our efforts on tackling those needs to create equality of opportunity

Tackling inequalities

Recognising the deep-rooted inequalities that prevent local people living active lives.

“Right now, the opportunities to get involved in sport and activity – and reap the rewards of being active – depend too much on your background, your gender, your bank balance and your postcode.”
Sport England, Uniting the Movement

Each and every one of us should have access to spaces, facilities, services and support that empowers us to be active – that fuels good physical and mental health, raises living standards and makes us feel part of our communities. Activity should be a normal part of our lives, no matter who we are. But today, across Lincolnshire and many areas of the UK, that’s just not the case.

During the the Let’s Move Lincolnshire strategy consultation, surveying and talking to citizens across the county clearly demonstrated that fewer than half of the people we spoke to felt represented by their local community, with many of those voicing concerns about feeling comfortable, or having a sense they belonged.

People told us they felt excluded from physical activity for a host of reasons – where they live, their income, ethnicity, health and gender. Intersectional issues around deprivation, cost, access and transport also created real challenges in increasing activity levels. All of these factors have established damaging inequalities, meaning that, all too often, the people who could benefit most from a more active lifestyle, feel excluded because the access and opportunities aren’t there.

Ethnicity

Here in Lincolnshire, many Black and ethnic minority people feel underrepresented in the places decisions are made, impacting their sense of belonging and making them feel unseen and unheard. Without a voice in the design of systems, spaces and support, it’s easy for people to feel excluded and unwelcome when it comes to sport and physical activity.

This is underlined by Sport England’s Sport for All report, which found that, across England, people from Asian and Black backgrounds are far more likely to be inactive.

“I feel out of place in exercise environments because of my ethnicity and weight.” Lincolnshire citizen


Gender

Sport England’s research tells us that women are less active than men, with a gender gap opening up at a very young age. One barrier to increasing activity among women and girls is a lack of environments where they feel safe and comfortable exercising alone.

Our Lincolnshire consultation showed that women are acutely aware of the perceived and real risks involved in solo physical activity. They adapt their behaviour to avoid certain routes, stay in well-lit areas and avoid unwanted attention – all with the aim of managing and mitigating safety concerns. Feelings of vulnerability feed into issues of self-esteem and anxiety, showing how important it is that we create safe active environments that improve psychological security.

“Being active in Lincolnshire comes with an element of risk. Road running is becoming increasingly concerning as a female… lights are shut off on certain routes, which I actively avoid, and I tend to run more in the centre of town – but that attracts attention. My partner worries for me going out for a run in the dark. I like the Sustrans cycle routes, but as a woman I feel too vulnerable to use them alone.”
Lincolnshire citizen

Income

Socio-economic factors also have a significant part to play in excluding people from physical activity and sport. Families we spoke to reported struggling with the cost of transport and activity classes, forcing them to prioritise other living expenses. This is backed up by Sport England’s findings that people in a lower socio-economic group are far more likely to be inactive.

15% of Lincolnshire residents feel they can’t afford to be more active.

Health

People who have disabilities and long-term health conditions are twice as likely to be physically inactive as those who don’t, according to Sport England’s report. It’s a finding that’s supported by our own Let’s Move consultation, in which local residents told us they find it difficult to access sport and physical activity settings where they feel welcomed and supported.

One fifth of Lincolnshire residents agree or somewhat agree that they can’t access places or facilities where they could be active.

Let’s Move everyone

The data, the research and the consultation all tell us that here in Lincolnshire, like many other places in the UK, we face real challenges around inequality and access to activity.

Each of the groups we’ve looked at experiences both unique and shared difficulties. While, in reality, people aren’t just defined by their ethnicity, gender, income or anything else, there are clear patterns in the lives and backgrounds of people who feel excluded from physical activity. Together, it’s our job to remove those barriers.

Towards better representation

Equality, diversity and inclusion form the golden thread that runs right through the Let’s Move Lincolnshire strategy and the work we’re doing across the county.

There’s a national public interest in – and demand for – more equality and equity, as demonstrated through the growing, vocal support for movements like MeToo and Black Lives Matter. As our consultation proves, Lincolnshire echoes these national, and indeed global, sentiments.

Better representation, greater equality and fairer opportunities for all are the bare minimum our residents deserve, and we need to rise to the challenge of providing them. There’s a priority need for diverse voices to be reflected and represented across our county. Achieving this will mean we’re able to make our communities more inclusive places where people feel they belong – where their concerns are heard, their needs are met and they’re able to lead more active, healthy lives.

Actions

Stakeholders, organisations, businesses, policymakers, statutory bodies and community leaders to develop a better shared understanding of the people in Lincolnshire who face greater barriers to participation in physical activity.

Together, we need to welcome and listen to the diverse voices in our communities and make sure they feed directly into the design and development of inclusive activities.

Impacts of working in this way

  • Equity of provision and access across the county
    - Greater feeling of comfort and belonging in our communities
  • Ability to focus systems, services and support on excluded groups
  • Understanding of what’s needed to make spaces safe, inclusive and accessible

How do we make it happen?

  • Listen and understand the audiences facing grater inequalities
  • Co create and co design options with the audiences we are aiming to serve
  • Commit to empowering all people across the county to lead more active lives
  • Recognise the specific barriers and needs of groups experiencing exclusion

Focus our efforts on tackling those needs to create equality of opportunity

Keep moving through our strategy

Continue reading through each of the chapters from our strategy.

Alternatively, return to the Strategy overview page.